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Facebook Photo Theater Killer Gets Rid Of Facebook’s New Photo View Mode

Facebook recently rolled out a new photo viewer which they say “makes it simpler and faster to navigate photos”. The benefit of the new photo viewer is the fact that no new pages are loaded even if the user views multiple photos on Facebook.

Facebook’s new photo viewer has caused quite the controversy among Facebook users with more than 2200 mostly negative comments about it. There are some that like the new style of the photo viewer while the majority does not like its features at all to say it mildly. When there is controversy there is usually a workaround around the next corner.

There are actually a few things that Facebook users can do to get rid of the new photo viewer. From manual workarounds like reloading the web page (hit f5 in the browser) to Ctrl-clicking (or middle-clicking) the photo to open it in a new tab so that the new photo viewer is circumvented to userscripts like the Facebook Photo Theater Killer

he userscript basically replaces the new photo viewer on Facebook with the old viewer that is still accessible. It is however not clear if Facebook will keep the old photo viewer up and running indefinitely. The userscript will break the moment Facebook disables the old photo viewer. For now, it is working perfectly.

The Greasemonkey script for now offers the only automatic solution to prevent the opening of photos in Facebook’s new photo viewer.

The script is compatible with Firefox if the Greasemonkey add-on is installed in the browser and Google Chrome if the Tampermonkey extension has been installed.

Users should see no sign of the new Facebook photo anymore after the script has been installed. Previous versions of the userscript showed the new viewer for a split second before the old photo viewer page was loaded.

Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox users can download and install the userscript from its Userscripts.org page.

via, gHacks

43 Million People Became Single on Facebook Last Year

43,869,800 people changed their relationship status to “single” on Facebook in 2010. But just 28,460,516 people changed their status to “in a relationship.” So, there are like 15 million Facebook users out there for the taking.

Facebook users uploaded more than 2.7 million photographs, shared 1 million links and “liked” 7.6 million pages every 20 minutes in 2010, according to the company. Among other data the social network is releasing: Lady Gaga was the most-liked celebrity on Facebook with 24.7 million likes, beating out Eminem with 23.7 million and Barack Obama, who had 17.2 million.

The numbers also offer a snapshot into Facebook users’ love lives in 2010. Some 43,869,800 people changed their relationship status to single during the year while 3,025,791 changed it to “it’s complicated.” Another 28,460,516 changed their status to “in a relationship5,974,574 to engaged and 36,774,801 to “married.

Meanwhile, here’s a look at Facebook activity from a randomly chosen 20 minutes:

– Shared links: 1,000,000
— Tagged photos: 1,323,000
— Event invites sent out: 1,484,000
—- Wall posts: 1,587,000
—– Status updates: 1,851,000
—— Friend requests accepted: 1,972,000
——– Photos uploaded: 2,716,000
——— Comments: 10,208,000
———- Messages: 4,632,000
———– Likes: 7,657,000

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Facebook uncovers user data sales


Facebook has taken action against developers it caught selling user names and contact lists.

The sales were uncovered as Facebook investigated a web browser bug that let user IDs be shared inadvertently. The user details were sold to data brokers who used the information to target adverts more precisely. The developers have been banned for six months from connecting to Facebook and must be audited to check they comply with the social network’s policies.

Facebook started investigating what was happening with user identifiers (UIDs) following media reports that the information and lists of contacts were being sold on to advertising firms.

In a blog post, Facebook said its investigation showed that the technical demands of some browsers meant that some user IDs were being leaked.

It also discovered that some developers that create applications for the social network were taking the user IDs of those who used their creations and selling them on.

Despite this, it said, it took the breach “seriously” and had imposed a six-month ban on the developers it caught out.
Facebook said the investigation “determined that no private user data was sold and confirmed that transfer of these UIDs did not give access to any private data”.

Facebook did not identify which developers were being punished and only said there were fewer than a dozen of them and none had any applications in the top 10 most popular used on the social network.

It named ad-targeting firm Rapleaf as one of the data brokers which had been buying UIDs. It said it had reached an agreement with the firm which would end Rapleaf’s involvement with any application on Facebook now and in the future.

Source BBC News & the Facebook Blog.

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