Developers

Google Glass Explorer Programme now open in the UK – £1000

Google Glass launches in the UK

Google Glass launches in the UK

More than two years after Google launched its Glass Explorer scheme in the U.S, it has finally made it available in the UK – but will set you back £1,000.

From today, any British resident aged over 18 can buy a Glass prototype from the official website for £1,000 – as long as they have a valid credit card. Google Glass was developed by Google X – the facility within Google devoted to technological advancements, such as driverless cars.

The wearable headset has also launched with partner apps including Zombies Run and Goal.com. It was initially designed in 2011 to resemble standard eyeglasses, but with the lens replaced by a heads-up display (HUD). Google later engineered a prototype that weighed 8lb (3.6kg), and the current version is now lighter than the average pair of sunglasses at 1.6oz (50g).

In April 2013, the Explorer Edition was made available to Google I/O developers in the U.S for $1,500.

The email from Google:

Hi there

The UK is known as a centre of innovation, where people like you are excited to explore new products and ideas. After many months of development, we’re expanding the Glass Explorer Programme to the UK, to bring together bold, creative individuals who want to help shape the future of Glass.

We wanted you to be among the first to know, as places on the Explorer Programme are limited, so join us soon.

Purchase Glass

Want to learn more about Glass, or try it with different frames and accessories? Schedule an appointment at our new London Basecamp. You’ll meet with a Glass Guide and learn how to make Glass your own.

Schedule an appointment

Until next time,
The Glass Team

We’ve had Google Glass for over a year now (shipped from the U.S) what do you think about this eyewear technology? Let us know down in the comments.

Facebook uncovers user data sales


Facebook has taken action against developers it caught selling user names and contact lists.

The sales were uncovered as Facebook investigated a web browser bug that let user IDs be shared inadvertently. The user details were sold to data brokers who used the information to target adverts more precisely. The developers have been banned for six months from connecting to Facebook and must be audited to check they comply with the social network’s policies.

Facebook started investigating what was happening with user identifiers (UIDs) following media reports that the information and lists of contacts were being sold on to advertising firms.

In a blog post, Facebook said its investigation showed that the technical demands of some browsers meant that some user IDs were being leaked.

It also discovered that some developers that create applications for the social network were taking the user IDs of those who used their creations and selling them on.

Despite this, it said, it took the breach “seriously” and had imposed a six-month ban on the developers it caught out.
Facebook said the investigation “determined that no private user data was sold and confirmed that transfer of these UIDs did not give access to any private data”.

Facebook did not identify which developers were being punished and only said there were fewer than a dozen of them and none had any applications in the top 10 most popular used on the social network.

It named ad-targeting firm Rapleaf as one of the data brokers which had been buying UIDs. It said it had reached an agreement with the firm which would end Rapleaf’s involvement with any application on Facebook now and in the future.

Source BBC News & the Facebook Blog.

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