Fb

Facebook Privacy Notice

Facebook Privacy Notice

Facebook has come up with “Instant personalisation” so what’s this? This allows partners to access your public information (Surely it enhances your experience on other specially selected 3rd party sites?) as it says:
We’ve partnered with a few websites to provide you with great, personalised experiences the moment you arrive, such as immediately playing the music you like or displaying friends’ reviews. To tailor your experience, these partners only access public information (like your name and profile picture) and information available to everyone.” – Facebook

To turn off instant personalisation on all partner sites, un-tick the box and follow:
Go to Account > Privacy Settings > Apps & Websites >Instant Personalization > edit settings & uncheck “Enable” (if available for you!) It shares your information with other website(s)

after all, they can’t just share information with third party sites surely without our consent surely?

New Facebook comments system rolled out to websites

Facebook looking for comments

Facebook has unveiled it has refreshed its commenting plug-in that allows Facebook users to comment on websites using their own names.

There are a number of sites already using the Facebook plug-in, including TechCrunch, and it seems that you can now publish the comments you make on articles to your own Facebook feed, allowing your friends to view what you think about particular stories.

It’s an interesting concept that completely opens up the idea of story commenting – something that is usually done through a pseudonym.

Like most commenting systems, a publisher who uses the plug-in can censor certain comments made, including the blacklisting of words and users.

To add the commenting system to a site you will only need a line of code and the ranking of comments will be done through how many Likes a comment gets.

This is not the first major change Facebook has made to its API this week. It also changed its Like button, making it more like the site’s Share feature.

via, PiadContent

43 Million People Became Single on Facebook Last Year

43,869,800 people changed their relationship status to “single” on Facebook in 2010. But just 28,460,516 people changed their status to “in a relationship.” So, there are like 15 million Facebook users out there for the taking.

Facebook users uploaded more than 2.7 million photographs, shared 1 million links and “liked” 7.6 million pages every 20 minutes in 2010, according to the company. Among other data the social network is releasing: Lady Gaga was the most-liked celebrity on Facebook with 24.7 million likes, beating out Eminem with 23.7 million and Barack Obama, who had 17.2 million.

The numbers also offer a snapshot into Facebook users’ love lives in 2010. Some 43,869,800 people changed their relationship status to single during the year while 3,025,791 changed it to “it’s complicated.” Another 28,460,516 changed their status to “in a relationship5,974,574 to engaged and 36,774,801 to “married.

Meanwhile, here’s a look at Facebook activity from a randomly chosen 20 minutes:

– Shared links: 1,000,000
— Tagged photos: 1,323,000
— Event invites sent out: 1,484,000
—- Wall posts: 1,587,000
—– Status updates: 1,851,000
—— Friend requests accepted: 1,972,000
——– Photos uploaded: 2,716,000
——— Comments: 10,208,000
———- Messages: 4,632,000
———– Likes: 7,657,000

Have your say in the comments below!

Facebook uncovers user data sales


Facebook has taken action against developers it caught selling user names and contact lists.

The sales were uncovered as Facebook investigated a web browser bug that let user IDs be shared inadvertently. The user details were sold to data brokers who used the information to target adverts more precisely. The developers have been banned for six months from connecting to Facebook and must be audited to check they comply with the social network’s policies.

Facebook started investigating what was happening with user identifiers (UIDs) following media reports that the information and lists of contacts were being sold on to advertising firms.

In a blog post, Facebook said its investigation showed that the technical demands of some browsers meant that some user IDs were being leaked.

It also discovered that some developers that create applications for the social network were taking the user IDs of those who used their creations and selling them on.

Despite this, it said, it took the breach “seriously” and had imposed a six-month ban on the developers it caught out.
Facebook said the investigation “determined that no private user data was sold and confirmed that transfer of these UIDs did not give access to any private data”.

Facebook did not identify which developers were being punished and only said there were fewer than a dozen of them and none had any applications in the top 10 most popular used on the social network.

It named ad-targeting firm Rapleaf as one of the data brokers which had been buying UIDs. It said it had reached an agreement with the firm which would end Rapleaf’s involvement with any application on Facebook now and in the future.

Source BBC News & the Facebook Blog.

%d bloggers like this: